A Quite Place part II (2021)



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A Quite Place Part II starts with a quick origin story of the first moments of the invasion. It is a nice way to add a little lore to the film and put writer and director John Krasinski in front of the camera. The film shifts and quickly picks up right where Part I left off with Lee dead and the farm on fire. Evelyn, Regan, and Marcus, Emily Blunt, Millicent Simmonds, and Noah Jupe respectively, are heading towards a light on the hill.


I saw both Part I and Part II in theaters. For the original, it felt uncomfortable eating popcorn because of how silent most of the film was. John Krasinski and his sound team did a fantastic job setting the audience on edge. In Part II there is more of a score to the film. Music is used to build tension in scenes like most horror films. It is a well-struck balance between the silent parts of the film and the more traditional sound mix in others. It frees you up to safely munch on some popcorn without disturbing those around you. I think it was a good move to not repeat the same novelty a second time as it would have had a lesser impact.


The film takes a cursory look at the nature of man during a crisis. It explores both sides of a community; the open and welcoming side and the closed-off insulated one that fears or takes advantage of outsiders. I would have like to see a deeper exploration of community. Regan is good-natured, so you know where the film will go.


As with most horror films, there are a lot of questions that go unanswered. We are still unsure of the motivations of the aliens. They are ruthless killing machines that do not consume their kills. Evelyn and Lee’s baby returns in part II. A soundproof, Oxygen fed box, is magical in the way it solves any and all crying baby problems.


I enjoyed Part II a little less than Part I because the novelty was gone. Krasinski course-corrected well to not overplay his hand with novelty. Part III is coming in a few years. Millicent Simmonds is deaf, and I like seeing the representation of the deaf community on screen in a format that usually relies heavily on sound.

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